Úlf-liðr

Old Norse Dictionary - úlf-liðr

Meaning of Old Norse word "úlf-liðr" in English.

As defined by the Cleasby & Vigfusson Old Norse to English dictionary:

úlf-liðr
m. the wolf’s joint, i. e. the wrist, see the story of Ty and the Wolf Fenrir, Edda 20,—‘then bit he (the wolf) the hand off, whence it is now called wolf’s joint (the wrist):’ the word is often spelt as above, e. g. Gullþ. 59, Fms. i. 166, Nj. 84, 262 (Cod. 468 in both instances gives ‘aulflið’). This etymology, although old, is quite erroneous, for the word is derived from oln- or öln-, see alin (p. 13, col. 2); the true form being öln-liðr, q. v.

Possible runic inscription in Younger Futhark:ᚢᛚᚠ-ᛚᛁᚦᚱ
Younger Futhark runes were used from 8th to 12th centuries in Scandinavia and their overseas settlements

Abbreviations used:

Cod.
Codex.
e. g.
exempli gratia.
i. e.
id est.
l.
line.
m.
masculine.
q. v.
quod vide.
v.
vide.
þ.
þáttr.

Works & Authors cited:

Edda
Edda. (C. I.)
Fms.
Fornmanna Sögur. (E. I.)
Gullþ.
Gull-Þóris Saga. (D. II.)
Nj.
Njála. (D. II.)
➞ See all works cited in the dictionary

Back