Fé-lag

Old Norse Dictionary - fé-lag

Meaning of Old Norse word "fé-lag" in English.

As defined by the Cleasby & Vigfusson Old Norse to English dictionary:

fé-lag Old Norse word can mean:

fé-lag
n. [this word and the following are of Scandin. origin, and found neither in early A. S. nor South-Teut. dialects; the Germans use genosse and genossenschaft; the E. Engl. felaw (mod. fellow) is a northern word]
fé-lag
I. prop. a laying one’s fee together, i. e. fellowship, partnership, Grág. i. 330, ii. 72, 73 (passim); eiga félag saman, Fbr. 102; nú leggja menn félag sitt saman, ok verja ór einum sjóð, Jb. 406; skipta til félags, to share in partnership, SkS. 32; eiga félag við e-n, to be in partnership with one, Eg. 76; leggja félag við e-n, to enter into partnership with one, FmS. iv. 124; hafa félag við e-n, id., 296: Hallr fór milli landa, ok hafði félag Ólafs ens Helga konungs, Hall traded in divers countries, and was in partnership with king Olave, Ó. H. (pref.), Fb. iii. 239; leggja til félags, to contribute to a common fund, FmS. vi. 183, viii. 20: in the law even matrimony is a félag or partnership (between man and wife),—in respect to the common fund of mundr and heiman-fylgja, vide the Grág.—In COMPDS, denoting common: félags-bú, n. household in common, Sturl. i. 180; félags-fé, n. a common fund, Landn. 33; félags-görð, f. entrance in partnership, Grág. i. 331, SkS. 33, 632: a contract, nema annan veg hafi mælt verít í f. þeirra, Grág. i. 331; félags-hross, n. a horse owned in partnership with others, Grág. i. 436; félags-lagning, f. a ‘laying’ of, or entering into, partnership, Grág. i. 331; félags-maðr, m. a partner, Hkr. ii. 157, SkS. 32; félags-vætti, n. a witness in matters of félag, Grág. i. 330, v. l.
fé-lag
II. a society, association; mann-félag, an association of men; mannlegt félag, etc.; vísinda-f., etc., literary society, is a modern turn of the word, and scarcely occurs earlier than the 17th or 18th century. It is now used in a great many compds: the passage in Sd. ch. 5, p. 123, where it means agreement, is a sure proof that these chapters are spuriouS.

Possible runic inscription in Younger Futhark:ᚠᛁ-ᛚᛅᚴ
Younger Futhark runes were used from 8th to 12th centuries in Scandinavia and their overseas settlements

Abbreviations used:

A. S.
Anglo-Saxon.
Engl.
English.
gl.
glossary.
l.
line.
mod.
modern.
n.
neuter.
S.
Saga.
Scandin.
Scandinavia, Scandinavian.
Teut.
Teutonic.
f.
feminine.
id.
idem, referring to the passage quoted or to the translation
i. e.
id est.
m.
masculine.
prop.
proper, properly.
pref.
preface.
v.
vide.
v. l.
varia lectio.
ch.
chapter.
etc.
et cetera.

Works & Authors cited:

Eg.
Egils Saga. (D. II.)
Fb.
Flateyjar-bók (E. I.)
Fbr.
Fóstbræðra Saga. (D. II.)
Fms.
Fornmanna Sögur. (E. I.)
Grág.
Grágás. (B. I.)
Hkr.
Heimskringla. (E. I.)
Jb.
Jóns-bók. (B. III.)
Landn.
Landnáma. (D. I.)
Ó. H.
Ólafs Saga Helga. (E. I.)
Sks.
Konungs Skugg-sjá. (H. II.)
Sturl.
Sturlunga Saga. (D. I.)
Sd.
Svarfdæla Saga. (D. II.)
➞ See all works cited in the dictionary
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