Faðmr

Old Norse Dictionary - faðmr

Meaning of Old Norse word "faðmr" in English.

As defined by the Cleasby & Vigfusson Old Norse to English dictionary:

faðmr Old Norse word can mean:

faðmr
m. [cp. Goth. faþa = φραγμός; A. S. fæðem; Engl. fathom; O. H. G. fadam; Germ. faden or fadem = Lat. filum; Dan. favn; Swed. famn; the root is akin to that of Gr. πετάννυμι, cp. Lat. patere, pandere, prop. to stretch out]:—a fathom:
faðmr
1. a measure = two passus, Hb. 732. 5, Grág. ii. 262, 336, Landn. 35, 131, FmS. viii. 416, Eluc. 43, Gísl. 14; very freq. used in measuring depths or heights; thus fertugt djúp, þrítugr hamarr, etc. invariably means forty fathoms deep, thirty fathoms high; whereas roads are measured by ‘fet’, stuffs, etc. by ‘ells’.
faðmr
2. the arms; brjóst ok f., FmS. v. 344, Sturl. i. 214, Rm. 16, Th. 9, Am. 73; sofa í faðmi e-m, to sleep in one’s arms, Hm. 114; hafa barn í faðmi, FmS. vii. 31: the bosom, Stj. 260. Exod. iv. 6: often in the phrase, fallask í faðma, to square one thing with another, set off against, Landn. 307, Orkn. 224, Glúm. 396, BS. i. 696, FS. 139, Gullþ. 19.

Possible runic inscription in Younger Futhark:ᚠᛅᚦᛘᚱ
Younger Futhark runes were used from 8th to 12th centuries in Scandinavia and their overseas settlements

Abbreviations used:

A. S.
Anglo-Saxon.
cp.
compare.
Dan.
Danish.
Engl.
English.
Germ.
German.
gl.
glossary.
Goth.
Gothic.
Gr.
Greek.
l.
line.
Lat.
Latin.
m.
masculine.
n.
neuter.
O. H. G.
Old High German.
prop.
proper, properly.
S.
Saga.
Swed.
Swedish.
etc.
et cetera.
freq.
frequent, frequently.
f.
feminine.
s. v.
sub voce.
v.
vide.
þ.
þáttr.

Works & Authors cited:

Eluc.
Elucidarium. (F. II.)
Fms.
Fornmanna Sögur. (E. I.)
Gísl.
Gísla Saga. (D. II.)
Grág.
Grágás. (B. I.)
Hb.
Hauks-bók. (H. IV.)
Landn.
Landnáma. (D. I.)
Am.
Atla-mál. (A. II.)
Bs.
Biskupa Sögur. (D. III.)
Fs.
Forn-sögur. (D. II.)
Glúm.
Víga-Glúms Saga. (D. II.)
Gullþ.
Gull-Þóris Saga. (D. II.)
Hm.
Hává-mál. (A. I.)
Orkn.
Orkneyinga Saga. (E. II.)
Rm.
Rígsmál. (A. II.)
Stj.
Stjórn. (F. I.)
Sturl.
Sturlunga Saga. (D. I.)
Th.
Theophilus. (F. III.)
➞ See all works cited in the dictionary
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