Ból

Old Norse Dictionary - ból

Meaning of Old Norse word "ból" in English.

As defined by the Cleasby & Vigfusson Old Norse to English dictionary:

ból Old Norse word can mean:

ból
n. [A. S. botl and bolt, byld, = aedes, mansio; cp. bytlian = aedificare; Engl. to build. In Scandin. contracted in the same way as nál for nadal: böl and böll are very freq. in Dan. local names, and even mark the line of Scandin. settlements]:—‘built,’ i. e. reclaimed and cultivated land, a farm, abode, esp. in Norway, where ból answers to Icel. jörð, Dan. gård; the value of the Norse farms is denoted by merkr-ból, eyris-ból, or the like; taka bóli, to take a farm,l. 328, 354. In Icel. this sense is almost obsolete, and only remains in such words as, ból-staðr, ból-festa; in local names as, Hörðu-ból, Sæ-ból, Lauga-ból, Ból-staðr, Breiðaból-staðr; in such phrases as, á bygðu bóli (opp. to wilderness), hvergi á bygðu bóli, i. e. nowhere, nowhere among men; and in a few law passages, Grág. ii. 279, FmS. x. 153, Otherwise, in Icel. ból and bæli denote the lair or lying place of beasts or cattle; ból and kvía-ból, the place where sheep and cows are penned; bæla fé, to pen sheep during the night.
ból
β. a den, Eg. 41, FaS. iii. 345, cp. Edda 74 (the lair of a serpent); tóku sumir heyhjálma nokkura ok görðu sér af ból, a bed of hay, FmS. vii. 296; liggja í bólinn, to lie a-bed, of a lazy fellow; cp. bæli.

Possible runic inscription in Younger Futhark:ᛒᚢᛚ
Younger Futhark runes were used from 8th to 12th centuries in Scandinavia and their overseas settlements

Abbreviations used:

A. S.
Anglo-Saxon.
cp.
compare.
Dan.
Danish.
Engl.
English.
esp.
especially.
freq.
frequent, frequently.
gl.
glossary.
Icel.
Iceland, Icelander, Icelanders, Icelandic.
i. e.
id est.
l.
line.
n.
neuter.
opp.
opposed.
S.
Saga.
Scandin.
Scandinavia, Scandinavian.

Works & Authors cited:

Fms.
Fornmanna Sögur. (E. I.)
Grág.
Grágás. (B. I.)
Gþl.
Gulaþings-lög. (B. II.)
Edda
Edda. (C. I.)
Eg.
Egils Saga. (D. II.)
Fas.
Fornaldar Sögur. (C. II.)
➞ See all works cited in the dictionary
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