Dalr

Old Norse Dictionary - dalr

Meaning of Old Norse word "dalr" in English.

As defined by the Cleasby & Vigfusson Old Norse to English dictionary:

dalr Old Norse word can mean:

dalr
s, m., old pl. dalar, acc. dala, Vsp. 19, 42, Hkv. i. 46; the Sturl. C still uses the phrase, vestr í Dala; the mod. form (but also used in old writers) is dalir, acc. dali, Hkv. Hjörv. 28; old dat. sing. dali, Hallr í Haukadali, Íb. 14, 17; í Þjórsárdali, í Örnólfsdali, 8, Hbl. 17; mod. dal; dali became obsolete even in old writers, except the earliest, as Ari: [Ulf. dals = φάραγξ, Luke iii. 10, and βόθυνον, vi. 39; A. S. dæl; Engl. dale; Germ. tal (thal); cp. also Goth. dalaþ = κάτω, and dala above; up og dal, up hill and down dale, is an old Dan. phrase]:—a dale; allit. phrase, djúpir dalir, deep dales, Hbl. l. c.; dali döggótta, bedewed dales, Hkv. l. c.; the proverbial saying, láta dal mæta hóli, let dale meet hill, ‘diamond cut diamond,’ Ld. 134, FmS. iv. 225: dalr is used of a dent or hole in a skull, dalr er í hnakka, FaS. iii. l. c. (in a verse): the word is much used in local names, Fagri-dalr, Fair-dale; Breið-dalr, Broad-dale; Djúpi-dalr, Deep-dale; Þver-dalr, Cross-dale; Langi-dalr, Lang-dale; Jökul-dalr, Glacier-dale, (cp. Langdale, Borrodale. Wensleydale, etc. in North. E.); ‘Dale’ is a freq. name of dale counties, Breiðatjarðar-dalir, or Dalir simply, Landn.: Icel. speak of Dala-menn, ‘Dales-men’ (as in Engl. lake district); dala-fífl, a dale-fool, one brought up in a mean or despised dale, FaS. iii. 1 sqq.: the parts of a dale are distinguished, dals-botn, the bottom of a dale, ii. 19; dals-öxl, the shoulder of a dale; dals-brún, the brow, edge of a dale; dals-hlíðar, the sides, slopes of a dale; dala-drög, n. pl. the head of a dale; dals-mynni, the mouth of a dale, FmS. viii. 57; dals-barmr, the ‘dale-rim,’ = dals-brún; dals-eyrar, the gravel beds spread by a stream over a dale, etc.:—in poetry, snakes are called dale-fishes, dal-reyðr, dal-fiskr, dal-ginna, etc., Lex. Poët. [It is interesting to notice that patronymic words derived from ‘dale’ are not formed with an e (vowel change of a), but an œ, æ (vowel change of ó), Lax-dœlir, Vatns-dœlir, Hauk-dœlir, Hit-dœlir, Sýr-dœll, Svarf-dœlir …, the men from Lax(ár)dalr, Vatnsdal, Haukadal, Hitardal, etc.; cp. the mod. Norse Dölen = man from a dale; this points to an obsolete root word analogous to ala, ól, bati, bót; vide the glossaries of names to the Sagas, esp. that to the Landn.]
dalr
II. a dollar (mod.) = Germ. Joachims-thaler, Joachims-thal being the place where the first dollars were coined.

Possible runic inscription in Younger Futhark:ᛏᛅᛚᚱ
Younger Futhark runes were used from 8th to 12th centuries in Scandinavia and their overseas settlements

Abbreviations used:

acc.
accusative.
allit.
alliteration, alliterative.
A. S.
Anglo-Saxon.
cp.
compare.
Dan.
Danish.
dat.
dative.
Engl.
English.
esp.
especially.
etc.
et cetera.
f.
feminine.
freq.
frequent, frequently.
Germ.
German.
gl.
glossary.
Goth.
Gothic.
Icel.
Iceland, Icelander, Icelanders, Icelandic.
l.
line.
l. c.
loco citato.
lit.
literally.
m.
masculine.
mod.
modern.
n.
neuter.
North. E.
Northern English.
pl.
plural.
S.
Saga.
sing.
singular.
Ulf.
Ulfilas.
v.
vide.
v. l.
varia lectio.

Works & Authors cited:

Fas.
Fornaldar Sögur. (C. II.)
Fms.
Fornmanna Sögur. (E. I.)
Hbl.
Harbarðs-ljóð. (A. I.)
Hkv.
Helga-kviða Hundingsbana. (A. II.)
Hkv. Hjörv.
Helga-kviða Hjörvarðssonar. (A. II.)
Íb.
Íslendinga-bók. (D. I.)
Landn.
Landnáma. (D. I.)
Ld.
Laxdæla Saga. (D. II.)
Lex. Poët.
Lexicon Poëticum by Sveinbjörn Egilsson, 1860.
Sturl.
Sturlunga Saga. (D. I.)
Vsp.
Völuspá. (A. I.)
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