Áss

Old Norse Dictionary - áss

Meaning of Old Norse word "áss" in English.

As defined by the Cleasby & Vigfusson Old Norse to English dictionary:

áss Old Norse word can mean:

áss
1. m. [Ulf. ans = δοκός; cp. Lat. asser, a pole], gen. áss, dat. ási, later ás, pl. ásar, acc. ása:
áss
1. a pole, a main rafter, yard;
áss
α. of a house; selit var gört um einn as, ok stóðu út af ásendarnir, Ld. 280; Nj. 115, 202; drengja við ása langa (acc. pl.), FmS. vii. 54, SkS. 425, Pm. 11, Dipl. iii. 8, Hom. 95; sofa undir sótkum ási, Hkr. i. 43; cp. CaeS. Bell. Gall. 5. ch. 36, FS. 62: in buildings áss gener. means the main beam, running along the house, opp. to bitar, þvertré, a cross-beam, v. mæniráss, brúnáss, etc.: the beams of a bridge, FmS. ix. 512; in a ship, beitiáss, a yard of a sail: also simply called áss, Ýt. 23, FS. 113; vindáss, a windlass (i. e. windle-ass, winding-pole).
áss
2. metaph. a rocky ridge, Lat. jugum, Eg. 576, FmS. viii. 176. Ás and Ásar are freq. local names in Iceland and Norway.
áss
COMPD: ássstubbi.
áss
2. m. [that the word existed in Goth. may be inferred from the words of Jornandes—Gothi proceres suos quasi qui fortunâ vincebant non pares homines sed semideos, id est Anses, vocavere. The word appears in the Engl. names Osborn, Oswald, etc. In old German pr. names with n, e. g. Ansgâr, A. S. Oscar: Grimm suggests a kinship between áss, pole, and áss, deus; but this is uncertain. In Icel. at least no such notion exists, and the inflexions of the two words differ. The old gen. asar is always used in the poems of the 10th century, Korm. 22 (in a verse), etc.; dat. æsi, in the oath of Glum (388), later ás; nom. pl. æsir; acc. pl. ásu (in old poetry), æsi (in prose). The old declension is analogous to árr; perhaps the Goth. form was sounded ansus; it certainly was sounded different from ans, δοκός]:—the Ases, gods, either the old heathen gods in general, or esp. the older branch, opp. to the new one, the dî ascripti, the Vanir, q. v., Edda 13 sqq.
áss
β. the sing. is used particularly of the different gods, e. g. of Odin; ölverk Ásar, the brewing of the As (viz. Odin), i. e. poetry, Korm. 208 (in a verse); of Loki, Bragi, etc.; but κατ εξοχην it is used of Thor, e. g. in the heathen oaths, segi ek þat Æsi (where it does not mean Odin), Glúm. 388; Freyr ok Njörðr ok hinn almátki Áss, Landn. (Hb.) 258: in Swed. åska means lightning, thunder, qS. ás-ekja, the driving of the As, viz. Thor: áss as a prefix to pr. names also seems to refer to Thor, not Odin, e. g. Ásbjörn = Þorbjörn, Ásmóðr = Þormóðr (Landn. 307 in a verse). In Scandinavian pr. names áss before the liquid r assumes a t, and becomes ást (Ástríðr, not Ásríðr; Ástráðr = Ásráðr); and sometimes even before an l, Ástlákr—Áslákr, Fb. i. 190; Ástleifr—Ásleifr, FmS. xi. (Knytl. S.)
áss
COMPDS: ásagisling, ásaheiti, ÁsaÞórr, ásaætt.

Possible runic inscription in Younger Futhark:ᛅᛋᛋ
Younger Futhark runes were used from 8th to 12th centuries in Scandinavia and their overseas settlements

Abbreviations used:

acc.
accusative.
cp.
compare.
dat.
dative.
f.
feminine.
gen.
genitive.
l.
line.
Lat.
Latin.
m.
masculine.
n.
neuter.
pl.
plural.
Ulf.
Ulfilas.
ch.
chapter.
etc.
et cetera.
gener.
generally.
i. e.
id est.
opp.
opposed.
v.
vide.
freq.
frequent, frequently.
metaph.
metaphorical, metaphorically.
A. S.
Anglo-Saxon.
e. g.
exempli gratia.
Engl.
English.
esp.
especially.
gl.
glossary.
Goth.
Gothic.
Icel.
Iceland, Icelander, Icelanders, Icelandic.
nom.
nominative.
pr.
proper, properly.
q. v.
quod vide.
S.
Saga.
qs.
quasi.
sing.
singular.
Swed.
Swedish.
viz.
namely.

Works & Authors cited:

Dipl.
Diplomatarium. (J. I.)
Fms.
Fornmanna Sögur. (E. I.)
Fs.
Forn-sögur. (D. II.)
Hkr.
Heimskringla. (E. I.)
Hom.
Homiliu-bók. (F. II.)
Ld.
Laxdæla Saga. (D. II.)
Nj.
Njála. (D. II.)
Pm.
Pétrs-máldagi. (J. I.)
Sks.
Konungs Skugg-sjá. (H. II.)
Eg.
Egils Saga. (D. II.)
Edda
Edda. (C. I.)
Korm.
Kormaks Saga. (D. II.)
Fb.
Flateyjar-bók (E. I.)
Glúm.
Víga-Glúms Saga. (D. II.)
Hb.
Hauks-bók. (H. IV.)
Knytl.
Knytlinga Saga. (E. I.)
Landn.
Landnáma. (D. I.)
➞ See all works cited in the dictionary

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